What does TB mean when compared to GB?

  • Asked by Rachel H from Chester
  • Jan 12, 2010
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QA Apple Time Capsule

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6 Answers from the Community

  • Best Answer:

    Mac OS X 10.6 correctly uses the SI prefixes, so:

    1 kB = 1000 B
    1 MB = 1000 kB
    1 GB = 1000 MB
    1 TB = 1000 GB

    Binary prefixes are marked with an "i":

    1 kiB = 1024 B
    1 MiB = 1024 kiB
    1 GiB = 1024 MiB
    1 TiB = 1024 GiB

    • Answered by Attila T
    • Jul 29, 2010
  • 1024 kb = 1 mb
    1024 mb = 1 gb
    1024 gb = 1 tb

    • Answered by Dominic B from Erie
    • Mar 1, 2010
  • A TB (Terabyte) is a THOUSAND times bigger than a GB (Gigabyte).

    That means more space than you'll know what to do with.

    • Answered by Ryan Z from Katy
    • Jan 13, 2010
  • The first answer is technically speaking correct .. 1,024

    For those who you are looking into the future ...

    True binary values are as follows: / = ( to its power .. x 10)

    1024 Ki kibi KB kilo
    1024/2 Mi mebi MB mega
    1024/3 Gi gibi GB giga
    1024/4 Ti tebi TB tera
    1024/5 Pi pebi PB peta
    1024/6 Ei exbi EB exa
    1024/7 Zi zebi ZB zetta
    1024/8 Yi yobi YB yotta

    I guess mathematically after that is GOD .. Omega (unlimited & forever) ;)

    • Answered by Chris K from West Allis
    • May 6, 2010
  • 1000 KB = MB
    1000 MB = GB
    1000 GB = TB

    TB means terabyte which just means more storage. There are 1000GB in a TB so TB is greater

    • Answered by Kyle B from Gastonia
    • Jan 13, 2010
  • A TB (Terabyte) is 1,000 GB (Gigabyte). A GB is 1,000 MB (Megabyte) and a MB is 1,000 KB (Kilobyte).

    Kilo, mega, giga, tera and so on are international standard terms, and are how Snow Leopard measures disk capacity.

    • Answered by Robin H from Sedona
    • Jul 16, 2010