Can you control the bandwidth of the guest network?

I share the internet with my neighbors and it always seems like they are slowing it down. If I disable the guest network the problem is solved. I want to control how much bandwidth they can use.

  • Asked by Kyle P from Saint Paul
  • Mar 22, 2010
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1 Answer from the Community

  • Without knowing which AirPort Extreme model you have.

    Open AirPort Utility, use Manual Setup, and adjust some settings on the "Wireless" panel - click the More Options and Wireless Network Options at the bottom and when that pane opens maximize your signal by increasing the Transmit Power to 100% and choose to Use wide channels. That might give the both of you enough throughput. Also increasing the Multicast Rate might slow their usage, but also might restrict yours depending upon your equipment - easy to change back if no help.

    Another alternative would be setting the first network as a/b/g/n for you, and set the second network as b/g for them. Or set the first to g and the second to b - whatever makes sense for the speeds of your equipment. N is faster than G which is faster than B.

    Or, another possibility - as long as you don't need a network for an iPhone, iPod Touch, wireless printer or an 802.11b/g computer, set your network Radio Mode at "n only (5GHz)" and set the guest network as "n only (2.4GHz)"

    To see all the options for the Radio Mode in AirPort Utility, press the "option" key (alt key) when clicking on the Radio Mode popup.

    If you need the 2.4GHz for yourself, have them use (if they can) the first network, set at "n only (5GHz)" and you use the so-called guest network setup as "n only (2.4GHz)"

    The potential problem is that setting "n only (5GHz) will prevent any slower device from using or even "seeing" the faster 5GHz network wirelessly. This may not be practical for them, just as it might not work for you.

    It's hard to know what will work best, but there is plenty of built-in flexibility to try some changes.

    • Answered by Andrew H from Carmel
    • Mar 24, 2010