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  • Best Answer:

    1 Terabyte (TB) = 1024 Gigabytes (GB)
    Usually, you won't be able to use the whole 1024 GB because of the device software and such. You can say that you will get approximately 1000 Gigabytes.
    I hope this helps. Have a good day.

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  • 1TB = 1000GB - (TB stands for terabyte) I hope this helps.

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  • 1TB=1,000GB

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  • 1TB (terabyte) = 1000GB(gigabytes), or strictly speaking 1024GB.

    However, you will only get about 999GB usable capacity after formatting.

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  • 1 TB

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  • It shows it is a 1TB drive. 1TB = 1,000GB. Hope this helps.

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  • 1 GB = 1024MB. Period. Full stop.

    However, the drive manufacturers like to claim that their drives are bigger than they actually are, and since the general public doesn't understand that drive size prefixes are based on numbers that are round in binary (1024 = 2^10), not decimal (1000 = 10^3), drive manufacturers made up their own false GB equal to 1000 MB.

    They then later retconned another unit, the Gibibyte (GiB), that they want to get people to use to refer to the 1024 byte GB, but this is against historical usage, and is pretty much a marketing term.

    To make this even more confusing, both OSX and Windows now report file sizes using 1000 MB GBs, lending further credence to the manufacturers' made up units.

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