• 2.0 out of 5 stars

    not backwards compatible??

    • Written by from Madison

    I had the previous version of this keyboard, and I love the design. Now, three years later I needed another for work, so I bought one new this week, assuming it was the same product.

    I find that it works fine, except for the top row of function keys, which are no longer correctly recognized by my Snow Leopard OS X. Reading the product details more closely I now see that this was never guaranteed. I didn't even think to look at the OS X compatibility previously, since... it's a keyboard. My mistake.

    For those of us who code with highly customized MacBook Pros, upgrading to a new OS X can be a time consuming and not always worthwhile undertaking. So it's irritating when Apple's own products (especially something so simple as a keyboard) are no longer fully compatible with an operating system of their own design that is only 3 years old.

    For now I will just deal with the top row of keys being unusable until I have time to try updating my OS X. But, this is both frustrating and disappointing.

    49 of 53 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Apple Quality Assurance: Please check this out!

    • Written by from O'Brien

    Having just recently purchased two of these keyboards for our older Macs. I have a better understanding of why so many people seem to either love them or hate them.
    It seems that there are no two of these new keyboards that behave alike. One works great. I had to return the other because of a strange time delay with the “up arrow” and especially the ”right arrow” key. Not a computer or software problem, it has been isolated the individual keyboard. The replacement has the same intermittent delay on the arrow keys, plus a space bar that only works about half the time. Pressing the lower half of the bar usually gets no response, even though you feel and hear the “click” of the key.
    Apple has designed the “Caps Lock” key with a long delay in its response, requiring the typist to “lean” on that key for an abnormal period of time in order to get it to lock or unlock. Apple is compensating for poor typing technique at the expense good typists.
    To test your keyboard’s response , Open “Keyboard Viewer” (under the “flag” on the Menu Bar; if the “flag” isn’t there, go to System Preferences / International / Input Menu, and check “Show input menu in menu bar”). The Keyboard Viewer will give you a visual indication of the response for each keystroke, easily displaying flaky key contacts or strange time delays. If you end up with one of these new Aluminum keyboards that doesn’t work properly, my advice is to have it replaced immediately (and repeat if necessary, until you get a GOOD one). There seems to be a high percentage that truly are defective. It’s time for the Quality Assurance folks at Apple to get a handle on this problem!

    54 of 63 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Order an extension cord with it

    • Written by from Joelton

    The keyboard itself is fine, but unless you plan on using it directly under the monitor, the cord is at least a foot too short. My desk has a keyboard tray that requires the cord to go around the back edge of the desk and up to the computer. There needs to be another 12 inches (18 would be even better) for this to happen. I'd go with the wireless, but I need the 10-key. An excellent product made useless for lack of 3-cents worth of wire.

    69 of 100 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Want to Like it

    • Written by from Seattle

    I want to like this keyboard. It's a gorgeous object and looks great on my desk.

    Unfortunately, the low profile flat keys make maintaining a consistent typing position more difficult than it should be, and their extremely short travel provides little positive feedback. I find the half-size function keys impossible to hit without looking.

    The fn key is badly located for a modifier key, and requires weird contortions to use it. And Apple's habit if using standard icons to represent the other modifier keys but not printing them on the relevant keys continues.

    Worse, the handsome matte white keys don't stay handsome long. They're dirt magnets, and quickly stain to a uniform level of dinge that defies cleaning.

    Finally, I've been through three of them in 18 months. Admittedly, I pound on them 8-12 hours a day and no doubt need to get a life, but still... a keyboard, like a shoe sole, should be designed to take some pounding.

    Guess I'm just a sucker for a pretty face...

    53 of 69 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Great but its wired!

    • Written by from Salem

    It looks great, it types great, BUT WHY is it not wireless? The Apple Keyboard Pro is awesome and because it is wireless. (I am going back to it.) Apple please get back to a full size wireless keyboard.

    56 of 78 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Died within a year

    • Written by from brooklyn

    It's a nice looking and feeling keyboard but this was my second one in 3yrs. Keys just stopped working. the caps/shift keys are slow to respond which makes it hard to type just about anything. Can't open it to clean/repair since it's glued and doesn't have screws. I like the general feel but the other things are a big bummer. For $50 I don't want to have to buy a new one every year!

    37 of 46 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Perfect in a universe where liquid doesn't exist.

    • Written by from Louisville

    This keyboard feels great, I love it, but my third one just died as a result of coming into contact with literally (really, literally) a single drop of water. The previous two suffered a similar fate, however after being sure that it was such a small amount (a drop of condensation from a can!). I'm not buying another. I have two older Macally IceKeys. In my frustration, I got one of them out and, using a pipette, put 5 mL of water, which is more than it sounds, right into the center of it. I'm typing on it now. It's not as pretty and doesn't feel as nice, but I'm typing on it. I can solve this difficult engineering problem for you, Apple. It'll cost a fraction of a penny on your 50 dollar keyboard. Hire me. If you have one of these, be extremely careful. Use in a room with at least 12 inches of desiccant covering all surfaces. Keep keyboard covered with the plastic from your grandma's sofa.

    40 of 52 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Not a great solution

    • Written by from Melbourne

    I purchased the wired keyboard for the MAC with the ten key pad. I needed this specifically for Quickbooks and Excel that I use in the Windows environment through VMware Fusion. My problem is the ten key pad does not work when I am in VMware Fusion. That is serious enough to send me back to a PC because that is where I do my work. While I love the MAC, I use it for personal and fun. I am beginning to understand why accounting and financial people strongly advised I not make the switch from the PC to the MAC.

    46 of 65 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    There are better keyboards for less.

    • Written by from Menlo Park

    I have been a touch typist for over 25 years. My Mom has been a touch typist for over 50 years. We both agree -- the keys on this new model have no natural weight to them and this causes us to make more errors.

    Apple, please bring back the previous model with normal sized keys and spring tension. That was an excellent, inexpensive keyboard.

    54 of 82 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    usb 2.0?

    • Written by from Dayton

    The feel of the keys is great, but the usb ports are completely useless. I get an "underpowered" warning when I try to use my sandisk flash drive. This is the same flash drive that worked fine on my old wired keyboard with usb 1.1.

    31 of 38 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Looks 10, Types 3

    • Written by from Bloomington

    So this keyboard has a great look and feels like a laptop. This is not a good choice for doing a lot of typing as the keys are too close together and don't give enough feedback - either tactile or auditory - when you type. This is a case of form being subservient to function. I made my own keyboard stand to put this keyboard in the proper angle and position to type with a wrist rest. Still not as good as some of the after market keyboards.

    30 of 39 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Love the touch, hate the shape

    • Written by from West Linn

    As an ergonomic specialist who studies bodies for a living and has used Apple products for over twenty years, I can only say I really dislike the shape of this keyboard and WISH Apple would provide the same touch on a split keyboard. Apple was the FIRST company to understand the need for a split keyboard. Unfortunately, they abandoned the design too soon. It took longer for many of us to understand why a split board was necessary. The engineered positive tilt to the keyboard is a problem as it REQUIRES wrist extension. A second problem with this keyboard is getting it properly set on keyboard trays. The slight positive angle of the board and its 1/8? inch height makes it difficult to put the wrist in a healthy position.

    62 of 103 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Mystery Keys

    • Written by from Studio City

    From time to time, keys stop working, then suddenly start working. Right now, I can't get a capital "w" using the shift key, I have to use the caps lock key. Very annoying.

    24 of 28 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Ergonomics

    • Written by from Lincoln

    I love the style of this keyboard, but ergonomically it is terrible. I wish Apple would come out with an ergonomic keyboard with style.

    23 of 29 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Does not work with KVM Switch emulators

    • Written by from Portland

    This is a great keyboard. I love the feeling of the keys and the slimmed down design; it's spoiled me for other keyboards. That said, form is one thing Apple did well, but they failed at function. This keyboard is incompatible with KVM switches that use emulation. It won't work with IOGear KVM's. I don't know if the keyboard works with Belkin KVM's, but I read that, if the KVM uses emulation (a common practice), you won't be able to use it with the KVM switch. Big, bummer.

    38 of 59 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    No power, No glory!

    • Written by from Naples

    I just bought this keyboard and I cannot use the spare USB port for either my iPhone or my flash drive. No power for either! My old keyboard (came with my 20" iMac) at least was capable of supporting my flash drive. A $50 keyboard should be able to do it all! I am very disappointed in Apple! Are you listening Steve?

    20 of 24 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    All touch (I mean pound), no action

    • Written by from Dallas

    LOVE the look, but give me my old key board back..... This is a keyboard that wants to be all touch, but lacks the sensitivity - drops letters everywhere. I would stay with the old deep seated keyboard until they get the action right. We have an office with multiple keyboards that have been replaced with the old style or (worst yet) MS keyboards.

    31 of 46 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Great design. Lousy reliability

    • Written by from Arlington

    Had my keyboard die after about 14 months of use. A couple of the buttons the left side of the keyboard stopped working.

    21 of 28 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Say good-bye to touch typing.

    • Written by from Atlanta

    PROBLEMS: (1) Flat keys. This makes it difficult to anchor on the resting row for touch-typing (the itty-bitty raised dashes on the 'j' and 'f' keys do not suffice). (2) Flat keyboard. This puts the number row a greater distance from the resting finger position, which makes the ability to anchor on the resting row even more important. (I am 5'4", to give you a rough idea of my hand size.)

    RESULTS: 1) A lot of looking back and forth between the keyboard and the screen, slowing productivity. 2) A lot of typos. (All of this improves slightly but doesn't go away with practice.)

    CONTEXT: This is really frustrating if you're typing mostly words, but really really really frustrating for situations when you use numbers or bottom-row keys, or when a typo will make something not work. (E.g., working in LaTeX, writing code, using command shortcuts, passwords with weird combinations of characters).

    On the other hand, these design issues might not be a problem for you if: a) you have big enough hands, b) you already look at the keyboard when you type, or c) you have amazing proprioception.

    OK THINGS: 1) The silver is pretty.

    BOTTOM LINE: If you like to touch-type, I strongly suggest trying out this keyboard before you buy it.

    27 of 40 people found this useful

  • 2.0 out of 5 stars

    Poor for male speedy typists

    • Written by from Leona Valley

    If you've got typical male fingers -- wider than a lady's or child's -- and you are used to typing very fast (> 50wpm), you'll find this keyboard terribly unresponsive. You really have to pound on it to get the keys to register -- there is no tactile feedback.

    Also, the angle shown in the photo is very misleading. The keyboard lies almost completely flat. The rear has less than 1/2 inch rise. If you are used to even a slightly elevated keyboard, you'll have trouble getting used to this one.

    In short, the keyboard is too dainty, keys are closer together than the previous iMac keyboards, typing angle is uncomfortably flat, and the tactile response yields considerable uncertainty as to what you have typed.

    Fortunately, I still have my old iMacs, so I simply use an older, less elegant, but much more functional and superior keyboard with my new iMac.

    30 of 46 people found this useful