As a wheelchair user can I use this monitor

I am looking for an activity monitor which will work, as I use a wheelchair and most monitors seem to monitor steps. Can anyone help

  • Asked by Mike H
  • 17/03/2013
Fitbit One™ Wireless Activity + Sleep Tracker

Fitbit One™ Wireless Activity + Sleep Tracker

Product No Longer Available

2 Answers from the Community

  • Answer

    Nike fuel band will

    • Answered by Ben H
    • 01/11/2013
  • I am in a wheelchair and I had a Nike Fuel band but it recently broke. It counts "steps" like all other bands but the Nike will display steps and ti will calculate Fuel points which I think takes your height and weight into consideration.
    In a wheelchair you need to think of any of these bands as activity trackers and not step trackers. Regardless of what metric it reports to you, it is all based on movement. What I did is use the number of "steps" counted on what I considered to be a good active day for me and that became my goal. I dont care what the number is because it is just a baseline. When I exceed the number I was more active than my target and if I do not reach the number I was less active than target.
    You cant use the calorie calculations because that is based on energy spent when walking. All of the programs take your height and calculate your stride distance based on that. Then when the number of steps is known it computes how far you traveled and when it factors in your weight and time it took to cover that distance it can calculate energy (calories) burned.
    Wheelchairs are more efficient than walking, on level ground we can push once (one step) and travel much further than a person taking one step. So we are able to cover more distance in the same time with one step. My guess is that it is safe to say we can travel 4-5x further than walking on flat ground. So you could assume that dividing the calories reported by Fitbit or Nike by 4 or 5 to get what you actually burn in a wheelchair.

    But, going uphill I think we burn more calories than someone walking. We lose all momentum and have to take many more steps to go up the same hill as someone who is walking. Again, a total guess so don't take it as fact.

    • Answered by Daniel P from Charlotte
    • 11/08/2014